Budgeting Made Simple


“I hate budgeting! Budgeting really sucks. But so does spinning out of control with my finances. Arrgh! where on Earth do I start? Everything’s a mess and I’m no good with numbers. . . . â€

If this sounds like you then a good place to start is with this sensible online course. Originally an e-book, the author used the methods described in the book to save enough money (as a single mom on a shoestring budget) to move from Australia to the USA.

The e-book was Featured on the “Books & Resources†page at Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Orange County for several years. Milli is now developing her e-book material into a fun course, with assignments that will help you develop a budget that works for you.


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CURRICULUM WILL INCLUDE:

Resolutions for the New Millennium
The A-B-C’s of Personal Budgeting
The Full [Monty] Budget Equation
Should bank accounts have sex?
How to Set Up Your Budgeting System
The Fine Art of Getting A Refund
7 Secrets For Handling A “Blow-Outâ€
We All Know Bullies Like To Bluff
Your Monthly Budget & Discretionary Spending Allowance


Excerpt from: BUDGETING MADE SIMPLE!
Copyright © 2003 Milli Thornton

RESOLUTIONS FOR THE NEW MILLENNIUM

BEFORE WE DELVE into the simple mysteries of budgeting, let’s get ourselves in the mood by saving some money. We are going to play a trick on Ye Olde New Year’s custom; namely, making a resolution. Don’t wait for December 31 to make yours.

For a short time only, be prepared to modify a habit or a hobby that you know is draining your finances. Make it something simple that you KNOW you can do, and then get organized before you start. So, what are the biggest stumbling blocks the average person self-inflicts when it comes to New Year’s Resolutions?

1) Trying to change too many things about your life at once

2) Rushing into it with no preparation

3) Choosing a huge, 25-year-old vice to eradicate—instead of a small bad habit to modify (i.e. make one small, positive change “for nowâ€)

For example, Pamela Lattébergen, 34, is addicted to expensive espresso. Every morning during her thirty-minute commute she stops at Holy Moly, It’s Java Time!’s drive-through window, where she orders up a triple mocha-donut café latté brevé, “tall,†with macadamia-vanilla infusion and a cinnamon stick on the side.

This Hollywood dream product costs Pamela a fat $3.25 every morning.

“So what?†I hear you say. “Let the girl have her coffee in peace.â€

But $3.25 multiplied by nine (yikes, Pamela consumes *two* on Saturdays and Sundays!) comes to a weekly total of $29.25. And that’s not counting the bagel or fancy croissant she tells herself every morning she will resist, but never does. After all, this is breakfast and she needs something more than coffee to fill her belly.

When Pam took a straight look at her finances, she was shocked at how much she was forking over every week to the Holy Moly café. Her pal from yoga classes, Tabitha Tofu, helped her formulate a sensible plan of action.

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